Tuesday, August 8, 2006

Stucco Removal Started

We started the herculean task of removing the stucco from the house. We're only removing it from the bottom portion for the time being. It took 2 days to remove one side of the house, and the weather was hot, too. I tried working in the morning, but ended up using an umbrella to keep the sun off in the afternoon. The stucco is 2" thick in someplaces, and unfortunately the cedar siding is cracked in places, where the wire lathe was nailed on with 10d nails. The tar paper was nailed on too, instead of being stapled. There appears to be only 2 coats of paint on the siding, so I guess that's good. We want to repair as much as possible, be may have to replace some of the boards, we don't know if they make exactly the same size of siding though. The top of the house is cedar shingles. We'll have to replace some of those, when we get to it next year. Our neighbours think that we're bonkers, we've opened a huge can of worms. And now we have to live with this frankenstein look on the one side. We're going to try and paint and refinish each section as we go, so the whole house doesn't look like crap. I'm going to redo the water table (the bottom of the siding) before the winter rains hit. There are some rotten boards, where a sidewalk was poured up against the house. I'll try to salvage some of the wood there, and use some new stuff. I'm adding flashing as well, to kick the water away from the house. We're looking for some creative techniques to repair some of the split siding. I have some ideas, and we'll see how it goes.


7 comments:

Greg said...

Wow Wee! Suddenly, removing my asbestos siding doesn't seem all that bad. I did mine more than 3 years ago and I'm only now getting around to painting.

StuccoHouse said...

My neighbors think I'm crazy for wanting to remove my aluminum soffits.....I'm going to refer them to your blog :-) You house will look so cool once it is back to clapboard. Kudos. You might look into two part epoxies (e.g. Abatron, Bondo) for repairing the split clapboard & nail holes.

derek said...

so even people with stucco houses are telling us to remove the stucco ;) It's not original to the house though, so that's the major difference. I was thinking of using bondo, I'll have to give it a try.

Jason said...

Thanks for your site. Our house is in Grandview and we just started removing the stucco from our house as well. Underneath seems to be 4" bevel siding. Although it is exciting to see the old wood exposed, it is a huge job.

What technique do you find the best to remove the stucco?

Also, is a ladder sturdy enough to remove the stucco up high?

derek said...

I'm thinking a ladder isn't the best way to remove stucco up high. When we start the top, I'll be getting scaffolding, at least for the sides, where you're high up. I've been using a roofing shovel, once it's started, to pry against a piece of plywood. I'm going to try an air hammer next year, I cut the mesh whenever I have a big enough piece.

Rufus said...

Diamond blade in 4" circular saw, set to 3/4 of the depth of stucco, cut long kerfs 6" to 12" apart to "break it's back" - then it'll be easier to pry off. Makita sold a small corded saw just for this purpose (NOT their 9volt cordless trim saw); vicious little thing, light weight, spun about twice as fast as normal circ saws. Dust is the problem with saws; I use a garden hose w/the nozzle set so a tiny spray, one hand for the hose, one hand for the saw, safety belt for you...

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